Our Work

History has shown that when children are not in school, problems bigger than just a lack of education arise. Prostitution, drugs, thievery, early pregnancy: these are just a few of the byproducts of idle children who have taken to the streets instead of the classroom. This negative trend is destroying more than just individual lives; it is ruining communities around East Africa. Kiambiu is no exception.

little_girlsOur strategy is to start small, focusing on one community at a time. Our current project is working with the people of Kiambiu, a slum area outside of Nairobi that is home to more than 100,000 men, women and children, all of whom are living in substandard conditions. We believe that the key to wiping out poverty is focusing on educating the community’s young people. This is why our main focus is on providing educational sponsorships and scholarships for Kiambiu’s young women and men.

Action Two Africa’s Child Sponsorship & Scholarship Program specifically targets students in this community by attempting to provide them with access to resources like education, food and nutrition, shelter and care, protection, health, and psychosocial support. We do this to ensure that orphans and vulnerable children in these communities have the same opportunities afforded them as every other child. A2A’s goal is to see that no child is denied a proper education because of their family’s economic status. Through this sponsorship & scholarship program, we hope to allow donors from anywhere in the world to support children as they advance through school.

Action Two Africa’s Microloan and Economic Empowerment Programs promote a culture of savings and stability among members, many of whom are already involved in Action Two Africa through their children’s inclusion in the Sponsorship Program. Members get together monthly and set aside money to be lent out for starting small businesses or participating in other income-generating activities, such as selling fish or second-hand clothes, operating a fruit & vegetable stand, or raising and selling chickens. Borrowers then pay interest on their loans, and this interest is redistributed yearly to other members to help them expand their own small businesses and meet other family needs.